Calling an Ambulance

November 19, 2018| Health and Wellbeing /

When you’re faced with a medical emergency, the most important first step is to ring triple 000 and speak with an operator.

All calls made to triple 000 are free and will initially transfer you to an operator who will ask you which emergency service out of police, fire or ambulance you require.

What to say when you call an ambulance

When requesting an ambulance to be dispatched, your call will be transferred to a trained triple 000 operator, who will ask you a series of questions.

  • What is the exact location of the emergency?

  • What is the phone number you are calling from?

  • What exactly happened?

  • How many people are hurt?

  • How old is the person?

  • Is the person conscious?

  • Is the person breathing?

When answering these questions aim to remain calm and answer in as much detail as possible. These questions are designed to allow the call-taker to appropriately prioritise your request for an ambulance and determine whether any patients may need alternative or additional services.

An ambulance will be dispatched as soon as you confirm the location and type of the emergency, but it is important to remain on the phone unless told otherwise. The call-taker will likely ask further questions while paramedics are en route. Answering these questions does not delay their arrival and will serve to further assist the paramedics to provide the most appropriate and very best care immediately upon their arrival at the scene.

Who can ride in an ambulance

Paramedics will most commonly allow one family member/friend to ride in the front of the ambulance while their loved one is being transported.

Can you choose where you’re going?

Patients are entitled to request transport to a hospital of their choosing, however the final destination will be at the discretion of the paramedics who will decide whether they can accommodate your request.

Take me to Epworth

Epworth HealthCare provides emergency department services in Geelong (8am – midnight, seven days) and Richmond (24/7).

If the situation allows, bringing along the following items will assist staff in facilitating your visit to the emergency department.

  • Medicare card

  • ID (e.g. driver’s licence)

  • Private health insurance card

  • Pension card

  • Healthcare card

  • Veterans Affairs ID



Rowan Webb

Contributor

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