So You’re Pregnant... What Now?

March 3, 2015| Health and Wellbeing /

Once that pregnancy test comes up positive, it can feel like you need an interpreter and a Masters degree just to understand what will be expected of you over the next nine months and beyond.

 

You will feel far less overwhelmed in these early stages if you break things down into bite size pieces. Here are a few important first steps to consider:

 

Start looking after yourself

Sadly, pregnancy tends to mark the end (for nine months at least) of a packet of chips for dinner and counting the walk between the kitchen and the television as exercise. Now is the best time to stop putting off getting active and eating well.

  • Find a multi - Get onto a pregnancy multivitamin as soon as possible. Some varieties have been known to cause nausea or other side effects so you may need to try a few before finding the right one. Often the level of iron will play a part so check with your pharmacist.

  • Don’t skip meals – Ultimately, your baby will make sure it gets what it needs by taking this from you until those stores are depleted. Listen to what you are craving right now as it will often tell you what you might be lacking. Pick nutrient rich foods as much as possible and divide your three meals a day into six or seven smaller meals to ensure a steady supply for you and the baby.
  • Know what to avoid - There are also a lot of foods you will need to start avoiding or being careful with due to the possibility of listeria – bacteria that is generally harmless to adults but can have serious consequences for an unborn baby. Foods such as undercooked eggs and fish, cold meat, soft cheeses such as feta and camembert, soft serve ice cream, pate, smoked salmon, certain types of fish/seafood and food leftovers can all carry listeria.
  • Get moving – If you didn’t exercise much before the pregnancy, don’t feel like you have to suddenly morph into an Olympic athlete. In fact, it is important to select the right kind of exercise that is safe in pregnancy – particularly if you are starting from scratch. Regular walking, swimming, including water aerobics, yoga and Pilates are all good options. The best thing is that it’s never too late to get started. 

 

Find the right obstetrician

This is a very personal choice that takes a bit of research and consideration. If you have confirmed you are pregnant with a take home test, your GP will be the next point of call. He or she will further confirm the result with a blood test, estimate a due date based on your most recent cycle and provide you with a referral to an obstetrician should you wish to enter the private healthcare system.

If you don’t already have an obstetrician, before visiting your GP do a bit of early research as you can request your GP refer you to a specific practitioner. Often the best way to do this in the first instance is to determine where you would like to give birth, as individual obstetricians will be associated with one or two specific hospitals.

 

Beware of Dr Google

From when you first confirm your pregnancy, right through until the birth of your baby, you will doubtless have many questions about the dramatic changes occurring in your body and about how your baby is developing. Most of us are pretty impatient when it comes to information and the web can seem the quickest and easiest way to get answers. However, while there are plenty of good sources of help, be very wary when selecting where to get your info from. Stick with sites by, or linked to, organisations you recognise by reputation, who are well established as healthcare providers and involve healthcare professionals.

Be careful when participating in or reviewing forums with other mothers as some of the answers provided are likely to scare you more than help you. The same goes for well meaning friends and colleagues who will feel the sudden urge to share their most horrific stories with you and provide conflicting advice.

At the end of the day remember that it’s your body and you know what’s best for you. Listen to the advice you are given but make a judgement call based on your own instincts and what feels right for you. 



Epworth

Join the conversation on The Village



February 12, 2019| Health and Wellbeing/

Mental Health - The Elephant in the Room

With the rates of mental illness on the rise in Australia, particularly in young people, we decided to open up the can of worms and speak to clinical psychologist, Hannah Hawkes, about the elephant in the room.

February 11, 2019| Epworth News/

EMI at Epworth Geelong to receive Medicare-eligible MRI licence

“A full MRI licence at Epworth Geelong means that patients will no longer compromise on health outcomes based on affordability.”

February 10, 2019| Epworth News/

Record Number of Graduate Nurses to Join Epworth

A record number of graduate nurses and midwives are set to join the Epworth team in February and March this year, for an exciting opportunity to consolidate their theoretical and clinical skills. 

February 10, 2019| Health and Wellbeing/

Tummy Troubles

Tummy aches can be extremely common in young children. Some are mild and non threatening, others need to be taken more seriously. Here we will run through a few different concerns and how best to handle the pain for your little one.

February 9, 2019| Health and Wellbeing/

Does it Need Stitches?

When your child injures themselves and bleeding is involved it can be scary for everyone. Knowing exactly what to do and when you should be seeking medical attention, can help to take some of the stress out of the situation.