On the Road Again

April 7, 2015| Healthcare News /

Driving is an important part of daily adult life. Losing the ability to drive safely as a result of injuries, physical or cognitive conditions can have an enormous impact on a patient. The medical team who coordinate Epworth's Driver Rehabilitation Program are discovering how a driving simulator can provide a safe and stress free option for re-education.

 

Driving a car is a complex task. It demands concentration, quick reaction times, good judgement, efficient problem solving skills and the ability to gauge speed and distance. Drivers must also be able to physically manage a car, use the gearstick, turn the steering wheel, apply the brake and so on. 

Numerous medical conditions can affect a person’s driving. Losing the ability to drive can have an emotional, physical and financial affect. Leading to feelings of isolation, impacting self-esteem and putting a person’s ability to provide for themselves and their family at risk.

The Driver Rehabilitation Program at Epworth aims to assist people to return to driving when they are safe and ready. The driving simulator is just one of the tools the team can employ to help get patients back on the road. 

It might look like an arcade game but this is actually a sophisticated machine capable of retraining drivers with specific orthopaedic and neurological conditions. Driving simulators provide patients with engaging treatment sessions in a safe, controlled environment where they can practice realistic driving skills. The simulator at Epworth has also been modified so it can be used for people with a variety of physical disabilities.  

“We believe Epworth is one of the first hospital groups in Australia to use a driving simulator,” says Occupational Therapist Pam Ross. 

“Traditionally, patients referred to the driving program would come in for a driving assessment and if they needed to learn to use equipment or practice a skill they would book lessons with an instructor,” says Pam.

“What we’re finding is that if a patient learns to use a new piece of equipment like a spinner knob on a steering wheel on the simulator first, it cuts down the number of lessons they need on the road, potentially reducing the overall cost.”

One of the other big advantages according to Pam is that using the simulator is stress free. 

Learning to use new equipment can take quite a bit of time and effort. Out in traffic this can be stressful and potentially unsafe. On the simulator patients can build up their confidence in a safe environment and we can assess them along the way.
— Pam Ross, Occupational Therapist, Epworth HealthCare

“We recently worked with a patient with multiple sclerosis whose condition had deteriorated to the point where she was struggling to use the left foot accelerator. She was able to learn to use hand controls on the simulator and said she found it so much easier to do without having to deal with traffic.”

Many of the possible applications for this technology are yet to be explored and while lessons on the road will always have a role to play in driver rehabilitation, the team at Epworth are looking forward to exploring its potential. 



Epworth

Join the conversation on The Village



November 19, 2018| Health and Wellbeing/

Ways to Prevent Osteoarthritis

Often called the ‘silent disease’, osteoporosis can develop without any signs or symptoms. Here’s some things you can do to help maintain healthy bones and prevent osteoporosis.

November 19, 2018| Health and Wellbeing/

Calling an Ambulance

When you’re faced with a medical emergency, the most important first step is to ring triple 000 and speak with an operator.

November 16, 2018| Health and Wellbeing/

When is an Allergic Reaction an Emergency?

In Australia, allergies are very common. Around 1 in 3 people will develop allergies at some point in their life. The most common allergic conditions are food allergies, eczema, asthma and hayfever.

November 16, 2018| Health and Wellbeing/

Tips to Stop a Nosebleed

Nosebleeds are an unfortunate commonality of life and can happen to anyone at any time. However, they’re usually not a signifier of an underlying health issue and can mostly be stopped through basic at home first aid.

November 14, 2018| Health and Wellbeing/

What to expect when you visit the Emergency Department

The emergency department assesses & treats people with serious injuries as well as those in need of emergency treatment.