Imaging Safety

November 14, 2018| Health and Wellbeing /

Getting an x-ray is not the frightening concept it once might have been. We know so much about all types of scans and the potential hazards and how to avoid them, and technology is rapidly advancing.

Some hospitals even boast an EOS now, which allows them to complete scans with 6-9 times less radiation than typical x-rays.

What is EOS?

EOS is a new Imaging system and it was evolved from a Nobel Prize winning invention. It allows Radiologists, Spinal Surgeons and Orthopaedic Surgeons, for the first time ever, to capture full body, life size images of a skeleton in 3D. It allows radiographers to take images with patients standing up or sitting down which is important for accurate diagnosis and treatment and makes it easier for children and the elderly to be scanned. This new technology is particularly helpful for patients wanting to minimize their radiation exposure and where weight bearing images are required.

EOS is a state of the art low-dose x-ray unit which enables highly accurate measurements of bone length and angles to be made from one exposure. The majority of scans performed are for the spine and legs, and enable precise planning for operative assessments and post-operative baseline imaging.
— Chris Perry, Chief Radiographer, Epworth HealthCare

So, how does it work?

You step inside the machine and remain still, the scanner then passes over you from head to toe to create an accurate 3D replica of you skeleton. The machine does this without even touching you.

The EOS is not only great for cutting back on radiation exposure and producing great images, it’s quick too! It takes less than 30 seconds to complete a scan, so it’s not too hard to stay still while it does it’s thing.

Because it does use much less radiation than typical x-ray and CT scans, it is ideal for children with paediatric scoliosis, a condition involving curvature of the spine, or any other conditions where repeated or regular scans are needed. It features automatic dose adjusters and detectors, allowing the scanner to administer just the right amount of radiation per patient. This is how it ensures the lowest possible radiation without compromising scan quality.

This isn’t to say that normal x-rays, CT scans, MRI’s and ultrasounds aren’t safe, this is just the latest in imaging technology and is a huge benefit to doctors and patients alike. Epworth Medical Imaging use an EOS and if you have a referral for an EOS scan you can head in without even making an appointment. Check out more about their machine, where to find one and what else you need to know here.



Sarah Stanley

Contributor

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